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Travel Insurance For DVT Sufferers

Travel insurance for people with a deep vein thrombosis can be arranged by World First who are international travel insurance specialists. World First offer cheap holiday insurance for travellers with DVT and annual travel insurance for UK residents with medical conditions who find it difficult to buy travel insurance with cover for deep vein thrombosis and associated medical problems elsewhere. For more information about travel insurance for DVT and a quote for your holiday insurance call World First for FREE on 0800 096 46 02.

Blood clotting provides us with essential protection against severe loss of blood from an injury to a vein or artery. However, blood is only supposed to clot when it is outside a blood vessel, and clotting within an artery or vein can be dangerous.

A deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein. The DVT usually forms in a deep leg vein, and can cause immobility (lack of movement). Deep leg veins are the larger veins that run through the muscles of the calf and thigh. A DVT can form across all, or part, of the width of your vein, blocking your blood flow completely or partially.

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If you need travel insurance to cover pre-existing medical conditions call World First Travel Insurance

World First travel insurance operate their own in-house screening service.
Once you have spoken to us about your health problems you will be told if you can buy travel insurance for your pre-existing medical conditions and whether any special terms will apply to your travel insurance policy.

All calls are treated in the strictest of confidence.

Fortunately, DVT is a rare condition with roughly 1 in 2,000 people being affected in the UK each year. It is less common in people under the age of 40 (less than 1 in 3,000) and more common in people over the age of 80 (up to 1 in 500).

A DVT usually develops in the calf, but it sometimes also occurs in the thigh. Occasionally, other deep veins in the body are affected. Inflammation of surface veins (superficial phlebitis) is much less serious and can usually be easily treated with medicines.

Symptoms

Travel insurance for people with a deep vein thrombosis can be arranged by World First who are international travel insurance specialists. World First offer cheap holiday insurance for travellers with DVT and annual travel insurance for UK residents with medical conditions who find it difficult to buy travel insurance with cover for deep vein thrombosis and associated medical problems elsewhere. For more information about travel insurance for DVT and a quote for your holiday insurance call World First for FREE on 0800 096 46 02.

A deep vein thrombosis (DVT) often forms as a long, soft blood clot that is attached to the inside of the vein at one end. It may become very large before breaking loose into the bloodstream. If the DVT breaks loose, it is known as an embolus, and it will be carried by the blood stream into the larger leg veins.

The embolus will eventually be carried into the vena cava (the largest vein in the body) which runs directly into the heart. From there it will be transported into the main branches of the arteries to the lung, where it will block the blood flow. The blockage, known as a pulmonary embolism, is a common cause of sudden, unexpected death. A severe pulmonary embolism will cause the lungs to collapse, and result in heart failure.

The symptoms of a DVT in the leg include:

  1. Swelling,
  2. Pain,
  3. Tenderness, and
  4. Redness, particularly at the back of your leg, below the knee.

A DVT usually (but not always) affects one leg. The pain may be made worse by bending your foot upward towards the knee. In some cases, there may be no signs or symptoms of DVT at all in the leg. The problem may only become apparent when a pulmonary embolism develops as a result of the blood clot in the leg.

Symptoms of a pulmonary embolism include breathlessness, chest pain and, in severe cases, collapse. Both DVT and pulmonary embolism are serious conditions and require urgent investigation and treatment.

Source:
NHS Direct Online. © Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and Queen’s Printer for Scotland.


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